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A living history reminder of WWI – John Babcock soldiers on.

A slight departure from politics in this blogpost. I saw this really cool news story -† “Last WWI vet celebrates 107th birthday”:

Canada’s last known surviving First World War veteran had an early birthday celebration in Spokane, Wash., on Wednesday with friends, family and a letter from the Queen. Surrounded by family and reporters, John Babcock opened a package of birthday wishes that B.C. MP James Moore brought from Canada. Included in the parcel were letters of congratulations from Queen Elizabeth and Governor General MichaŽlle Jean and a tie with red poppies from Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Babcock said that he still loves Canada even though he’s been an American citizen a long time. I think I can say for a lot of people that the feeling is mutual up here towards him. He says he didnt feel like a real soldier because he got to fight before the war ended, but I don’t think he should feel that way. The fact he would be brave enough and feel duty bound to sign up to represent his country – even though he was not of age yet to do so – is more then enough for him to get the accolades he deserves.

1 comment to A living history reminder of WWI – John Babcock soldiers on.

  • "The fact he would be brave enough and feel duty bound to sign up to represent his country – even though he was not of age yet to do so – is more then enough for him to get the accolades he deserves."

    Scott, I fully understand your warm and fuzzy sentiments toward Babcock (which I also feel).
     
    But I'd temper those sentiments a tad with the well researched opinion lots of folks hold that World War I had Canada and other allies of the British empire send people to die for a bad cause.

    To begin with, that war was all about the conflict between two rival empires belonging to a the Kaiser and a King.  The only result of that war, fought for Britain's imperial glory, was that the British empire of the day set the historical stage for Hitler's rise to power.  

    The Canadian soldiers who died threw away their lives for King and country, just as they did when they went to fight the Boers in South Africa. They died for nothing. They threw away their lives as cheap fodder for England's imperial ambitions. 

    Glenn Fitzgerald.

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