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Tories slump in new poll: Macleans issues its version of the “cut and run” meme.

It’s amazing how a few short months ago, the Tories were seen as merely needing to deliver a feel-good budget, call an election, and be almost seen as shoo-ins by some to win a majority government. The Tories must have felt the same way, since they now are trying to scramble to figure out what to do in the Fall.

They’ll need to find something, as they’ve now slumped into a tie with the Liberals, with the media story questioning whether Harper has started to lose his way among certain segments of the Canadian society. Heck, even the wealthy section of the population are starting to lose confidence in him, which the pollster attributes to possibly the income trusts issue.

I will also note that almost on queue, this week’s print issue of Macleans magazine (which doesnt have their story up on the website yet, so the reason why no link) is arguing about Canadian troops making “considerable progress” in Afghanistan and making a ridiculous comparison about how a pullout now from Afghanistan is the equivalent of the Canadian troops at Normandy in WWII turning around and going home after landing on the beaches.

A prime example of the far-right (and at times Toronto Sun tabloid-like) tilt that once proud magazine has become under the influence of all of the ex-National Post people, and a main reason why I let my subscription of it run out.

5 comments to Tories slump in new poll: Macleans issues its version of the “cut and run” meme.

  • Odd how nobody ever seems to bring up a comparison to Dunkirk or Deippe.  I suppose we should have "stayed the course" and not retreated in those situations too?  After all, it was the same enemy, and even more dangerous at the time.

  • “arguing about Canadian troops making considerable progress in Afghanistan and making a ridiculous comparison about how a pullout now from Afghanistan is the equivalent of the Canadian troops at Normandy in WWII turning around and going home after landing on the beaches”

    That is quite the stretch Scott; it’s not even close.

  • Anyway, Scott, I'll make one more comment.

    Your posts here reflect an amazing ability to select the most relevant news of the day and pick up on it.

    You need to be cross-posting this stuff—somewhere. It's a crime that your posts about these issues go no further than this blog.  Maybe you need to become an iron-headed pragmaticist and focus just on the issues to the exclusion of any other factor.

    It's all about the issue and how well you can raise it in public. Forget about all the personal stuff. Forget about grudges and arguments, etc. Just focus on the issue. And that kind of focus is what will eventually put your commentary ahead of the fake journalists over at publications like Macleans Magazine.

    Just my opinion.

    Glenn

  • I figured they would pull that one eventually. That's why I came up with this Harper Cut and Run Government

  • "A prime example of the far-right (and at times Toronto Sun tabolid-like) tilt that once proud magazine has become under the influence of all of the ex-National Post people, and a main reason why I let my subscription of it run out."

    Yet, Scott, inspite of all the Canadian media's pro-war propaganda, the Canadian people seem often to remain unmoved and uninfluenced by its writers.

    You've also noticed that trend, haven't you?

    The Canadian  media keep reporting on Canadians' opposition to the war in Afghanistan, for example, but fail to mention that such opposition can't really be coming from the Canadian media—the media such as the Can-West controlled Macleans Magazine ( I think Asper now owns that degenerated rag).

    So what gives? I wonder if people in general have just become far more inclined toward skepticism of the traditional media.

    Glenn Fitzgerald

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