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Garth Turner declares himself for MMP – the Globe gets perfectionist

This kind of came out of nowhere to some of us who support MMP, but I think we’re all delighted to see that Garth has come out yesterday with a long detailed column at his blog declaring himself in favour of MMP passing on October 10th:

A proportional representation system empowers voters. It gives them more choice. It ensures the majority opinion is reflected in government. It is fairer. It allows smaller parties a role. It encourages compromise. It lets parties increase the role of women and minorities as list candidates. It permits citizens to decide on the best local candidate, and also the best party to govern. One voter. Two votes. And, I seriously hope, an end to politics as we know it.

That’s about as good of a summary as to why many of us support MMP passing.

UPDATE: I’ll also note with some disappointment the Globe and Mail’s editorial today advising Ontarions to reject MMP – not because they don’t like electoral reform, or for that matter Mixed-Member in principle. They do in fact state in their editorial that Canada should be moving towards a Mixed-Member system (they also endorsed a mixed-member model to be used in Canada in a series of articles in May 2005, which I’m kind of surprised they didn’t mention, though some of the features they say are missing in Ontario’s MMP model and in theirs they alluded to). They just don’t like THIS particular version of MMP. They repeat some of the charges about this version of MMP that the No side has been using about “fringe parties” and so on. They would advocate starting over again and setting up an “expert’s panel” to get the MMP proposal right (apparently Citizen’s Assemblies are too populist for them).

I say the better way to go is to go with what we have to vote on, and if improvements can be made, tinker with it after its in place. I’m inclined to believe that if MMP is rejected, and its under 50%, proposed electoral reforms of any sort in Ontario will be declared dead for at least a decade, if not a generation. The current form of MMP may not be perfect, but its better then what we’re using now, and I think the Globe missed that in wanting in their eyes to wait for a better form of MMP to come along.

3 comments to Garth Turner declares himself for MMP – the Globe gets perfectionist

  • Wait, I should clarify. What is the threshold for it to pass? It was 60% in BC.

  • "I’m inclined to believe that if MMP is rejected, and its under 50%, proposed electoral reforms of any sort in Ontario will be declared dead for at least a decade, if not a generation."

    BC’s experience doesn’t really reflect this, but you’ve taken them into account with your 50% proviso. I think that the Ontario proposal will pass or fail by a few points above or below the threshold. If it gets less than 50%, then it probably doesn’t deserve to be re-visited for a generation.

    People need to untwist their panties over electoral reform. This is a modest proposal, and I don’t understand how sensible people can be genuinely upset over the prospect of either MMP or sticking with our current system.

  • The first 2/3 of the article echoes my sentiments exactly, until they got to all the false arguments about the 3% threshold and the lists.

    However, like the article, I hope that the Liberals will revisit the issue and that it won’t just die on the table.

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