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Supreme Court rules Canada acted illegally against Omar Khadr.

This is a big ruling that just got released that shows while Harper and the Conservatives may be okay with Guantanamo and the fact the process down there breaks international law, the Canadian Supreme Court unanimously begs to differ:

Canadian agents acted illegally when they interrogated Guantanamo Bay detainee Omar Khadr and handed that intelligence to U.S. authorities, the Supreme Court ruled today in a decision damning the Bush administration’s treatment of foreign terrorism suspects. The unanimous decision released this morning said the federal government now must hand over documents pertaining to those 2003 interrogations by agents with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and Foreign Affairs Department, since Canada participated in a process that was contrary to international law.

This took place prior to the Conservatives being in government of course, so the prior Liberal government bears some of the brunt of this as well, but its being painted as bad news for the Conservatives, because of their vocal lone support of the Guantanamo process contrary to everyone else in the world, and the only Western nation left that has a citizen there:

The ruling delivers a blow to Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government which has been unwavering in its support of the U.S. war crimes prosecution of Khadr despite mounting domestic and international pressure.

That’s what happens when you tie yourself too tightly to a US administration that has engaged in illegal activity contrary to international law.

More on the specific ruling over at Kady O’Malley’s blog at Macleans.

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