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Lots of odds and ends to talk about this morning

There are several stories that caught my eye over the weekend. Here are some of them:

It appears the Mennonites are the latest group in Canada to get on the wrong side of the Conservative government:

The Mennonite Central Committee Canada reports on its website that the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) has turned down MCC’s proposal of $2.9 million for each of the next three years to provide food, water and income generation assistance for people in India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Haiti, Bolivia, Mozambique and Ethiopia. MCC is a long-time partner of CIDA’s in overseas development projects. The organization is highly respected and is scrupulously non-partisan in its approach to governments and development.

Where is CIDA re-allocating that money? Why, to mining companies of course: “CIDA announced $26 million in other projects, including partnerships with several Canadian mining companies and other NGOs to promote “corporate social responsibility projects” in Burkina Faso, Peru and Tanzania”. We are now apparently tying our aid money to wherever we can potentially help our business interests make a profit off someone else’s land.

Its hard to make an adversary out of a sect of Christianity that is pacifist and wants to help poor people in Asia and Africa, but Harper has managed it. The man and his government never ceases to appall me. I should stop being surprised, I suppose, at this government’s behaviour.

In other news, Public Safety Minister Vic Toews is apparently  trying to set a record for the number of times he loses in court in a calendar year:

For the third time in six weeks, the Federal Court of Canada has slapped down Public Safety Minister Vic Toews for rejecting the transfer of a Canadian citizen imprisoned in the U.S. for a drug crime. In a Jan. 19 decision, Justice Robert Barnes overturned Toews’ refusal to approve Richard Goulet’s 2008 application to serve the rest of his sentence in Canada. Toews must now reassess Goulet’s application within 45 days. It took Toews more than two years to rule on Goulet’s transfer application, and when he finally did in December 2010, he rejected it, despite a report by Correctional Services Canada that concluded he posed no threat to the security of Canada.

In his decision, Barnes pointed out that the law requires Toews to give reasons for his decision. He said it was “impossible to tell” what factors caused Toews to deny Goulet’s application.

Unfortunately for Vic, he can’t ignore the courts as he and the Conservatives routinely do with Parliament. It must be pointed out (again) that for all the claims from the Conservatives they are for law and order, they have a habit of trying to ignore the “law” part of that equation when it involves law or rulings of law that goes against their ideology.

 

5 comments to Lots of odds and ends to talk about this morning

  • Stan

    Jobs in third world countries are a bad thing now?
    Hint, mining companies hire people!

  • Fred from BC

    Except for that constitution thing.

    Which is only *interpreted* by the courts, not created by them. Parliament is still supreme.

  • Roll Tide

    Kairos is bad news. Time to defund.

  • Fred from BC

    The organization is highly respected and is scrupulously non-partisan in its approach to governments and development.

    Not scrupulous enough to realize that continued association with Kairos was a really bad idea.

    Unfortunately for Vic, he can’t ignore the courts as he and the Conservatives routinely do with Parliament. It must be pointed out (again) that for all the claims from the Conservatives they are for law and order, they have a habit of trying to ignore the “law” part of that equation when it involves law or rulings of law that goes against their ideology.

    The courts have their limits, and they know it. They often issue ‘findings’ instead of rulings, and have to be careful not to push the government too far. They know the limits of their power, and that it is Parliament who actually decides what is lawful and what is not.

    • Beerbob

      Except for that constitution thing. It’s not perfect, by any means, and I thought it was a waste of time when Trudeau pushed for it. Looking at the kind of people that are starting to make up our federal governments, I’m pretty sure that I was wrong about that.

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