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You are reading the blog of a potentially disenfranchised voter….

…if Bill C23 passes in it’s current form. I may be one of those Canadians (potentially 4 million of us, according to Canadian election law experts) who may not be allowed to vote, if Bill C23 passes in its current unaltered form. Why is that?: Well, I don’t have a Driver’s License (by choice), and my other government issued ID’s do not include my current address, and vouching (which I’ve never had to use before, I might add) is also going to be removed.

This “39 pieces of ID is more then reasonable” argument, that Democratic Reform Minister Pierre Poilievre an his Conservative Party members trots out all the time is, as Karl Nerenberg writes, at best, misleading.

Bill C-23, the Conservative Party’s version of US Republican vote suppression, must be amended or removed. If it is not, expect it to be swiftly constitutionally challenged in the courts (and, I believe, it will be struck down, hopefully before the next election occurs in Oct 2015)

15 comments to You are reading the blog of a potentially disenfranchised voter….

  • Buck

    From the actual BILL
    (3.1) If the address contained in the piece or pieces of identification provided under subsection (2) does not prove the elector’s residence but is consistent with information related to the elector that appears on the list of electors, the elector’s residence is deemed to have been proven.

    So assuming you have neighbors that have the same rural box numbers/ addresses, you will be in the clear.

  • Me too – no driver’s licence by choice. Have passport, citizenship card, health card, credit cards, S.I.N. card, library card – none of which have an address.
    My legal mailing address where I’ve lived for decades is a rural box number not accepted as proof of address by Elections Canada.
    Where I live in BC, rural box numbers were recently changed to street addresses, even though we still pick up our mail at post office boxes, so I will no longer need to find someone with a drivers licence to vouch for my vote.
    But I’d be interested to know whether this change from rural box numbers to street addresses is Canada-wide or just local – in which case many other rural people without drivers licences will still need vouching to be able to vote.

  • The Rat

    However do people vote in Ontario or Quebec where vouching is not allowed in provincial elections?

  • Rob

    I’m so confused about what I hate more about this bill. The changes they’re proposing to make, or how they are ‘ramming this through’. It’s absolutely, fundamentally the most important conflict of interest that can be made in any society – a government of the people making changes to the process that determines which political stripe attains power. Whether the changes result in more fair or less fair elections, no matter which party is proposing rule changes, the process of making these changes needs to be managed in such a way not to undermine the legitimacy of future governments elected under those rules. In the long run, the Conservatives are hurting themselves as much as anybody. But of course they don’t see it that way. They’re too short-sighted to think any further ahead than the next election.

  • Ryan Spinney

    Nobody deserves to have your rights removed like this.

    I did not have the proper id until recently and if this bill had been pasted last election I would not have been able to vote in the last election.

    My suggestion just in case is to get an Ontario Identification Card, although that maybe easier to get if you get your health card first like I did. The OIC is basically like a car licience for those that don’t drive, but need ID.

  • rumleyfips

    I have a drivers license , proof of insurance and car registration but nothing else that fits the LIST OF DOOM. No mortgage, no house insurance an no paper utility or credit card statements; they all come by email. I get my mail by Rural carrier so a lot of my mail does not have a civic address. Out of the 39 I have 3.

    I have seen nothing about the elimination of door to door mail delivery and the forced march to the Superbox ( us seniors have demanded this to get into shape don’t ya know ). Will mail to a Superbox number trigger aggression in conservative attack scrutineers.

  • fhl

    Scott I appreciate your dilemma
    Do you have a bank card , a credit card , those are allowed if you bring your original statement
    with your address on it
    hope this helps

  • Loraine Lamontagne

    Note that the driver’s licence and healthcard with address do not prove citizenship.

    Citizens should not have to have to pay to be able to vote. My son, who will never drive due to a disability, and has an ON resident health card that does not include an address, needs to produce a passport to prove his personal identity and citizenship, a document for which one has to pay, and a couple of documents linking his name to his address.

    I’ll have a look at that list of 39 documents government always point to but I would bet you have to pay for most of those.

  • Windsurfer12

    I don’t recall hearing on any of the mainstream media, CBC, CTV, others – anyone asking Mr. Pollievre directly “are you engaging in Republican voter suppression tactics with what you’re proposing?”

    Listening to him on Evan Solomon, he gave no ground and as much as said ‘we’re ramming this through so screw off.”

  • Jennifer Ross

    I worry a court challenge will be thrown out as my understanding is you can’t litigate over “potential” results. So only after the election is stolen can we go to the courts, and by then I’m sure Harper will have managed to stack it with the puppets he seems so good at finding.

    But, what finally got me paying attention was the time I was told I couldn’t vote in an election I felt I had a right to vote in. Maybe if we can identify those who will be disenfranchised and explain to them that they are giving up their *personal* rights by sitting on the sidelines, they might think to get involved. Or maybe not. Sigh.

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